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A few weeks ago, I promised on my Instagram stories that I will be sharing my photo editing tips and tricks. Don’t worry guys!! I definitely haven’t forgotten about my promise! 🙂 Okay – Enough fluff, let’s go straight into the good stuff. Here is how I edit my Instagram Photos!

PS: Just a quick intro for those who found this post via Google Search, you probably don’t know me so here is a link to my Instagram account @girleatworld, where my photo taking and editing style have earned me over 390k followers.

The Camera I use

This is one of those “if I have a nickel everytime someone asks me…” question. I’ve gotten questions from many of you asking me what camera I use, and I think the answer surprised most people. I take my photos with the one device that’s always in my pocket (and probably yours as well): iPhone’s small, yet powerful camera.

I had an SLR camera which I used to take with me on my travels many years ago. But since I got my first iPhone in 2010, I have slowly transitioned to using just the iPhone camera. I’m a no-fuss casual photographer and I want to edit my photos on the spot without having to deal with transferring files, so phone-editing is perfect.

I also love how a small phone camera allows me to snap away inconspicuously and efficiently. Taking a photo for @GirlEatWorld is not exactly a glamorous activity so I prefer to blend in and take it as quickly as possible.

Me, taking a photo in Old Town Prague and trying not to get hit by traffic.

Disclaimer: All the tips and apps I’m going to recommend are for iPhone. Unfortunately, I can’t advise if other phones have the same features since I am not experienced with them. Also, I’m by no means a professional photographer – I’m just sharing all the self-learned methods I’ve discovered over the years so these tips might seem very elementary to some of you.

Tools & Gears I use

Camera Gears

  • iPhone XS Max 256GB -I have pretty much used all iPhone generation since iPhone 4. I’ve always opted for the biggest storage because I take a lot of photos and I don’t want to worry about running out of space. With the 256GB storage, I have not had to empty out my photos or delete apps in 3 years (!!).
  • Ring Grip Holder – It’s a ring-shaped plastic that can be attached to the back of your phone case. This grip might look weird, but it has been massively helpful in providing more grip and stability. Having the grip on the back of the phone allows me to easily take photos with one hand.
  • Mobile Tripod – A flexible and lightweight tripod like this is a nice to have, especially if you’re traveling alone or you want to get a group shot with everyone in it. It also helps with stuff like time-lapse videos.

iOS Apps

I’ll elaborate more on how I use these apps throughout the post, but I’m just putting it here for easy access.

  • Camera+ – for advanced control of your native camera
  • VSCO Cam – for post-processing and filters
  • Afterlight 2 – for effects like borders and light leaks
  • Facetune – to clean up some distraction and smoothen out textures

Let’s start with the basics: Phone Photography Tips

I’ll be straight with you guys – there is no shortcut to great photography. The only secret is that you must spend time honing your photography skills and keep practicing it. It wouldn’t matter how much editing you do, nothing beats properly shot photos.

So without further ado, here are a few photography tips that have helped me:

1. Composition is LIFE

No matter what camera you use, you must master framing your photos. This is usually referred to as Photo Composition. It is probably the most time-consuming skill to learn, but it is the most rewarding as it allows you to define your own photography style.

I suggest watching this quick video of composition tips by Steve McCurry, one of my favorite travel photojournalist. There are many different types of composition and style, and over time you will start to develop your own style.

As for me, ever since I picked up my first camera I had been obsessed with perfect symmetry (Wes Anderson is my favorite movie director, as you may have guessed) and bokeh, the blurred / out of focus effect you tend to get with certain lens if you take close up shots of an object. Combining these two styles resulted in photos you see at @GirlEatWorld.

2. Use Grids to help you compose

If you are an iPhone user, there is a native support to compose your photos. I recommend to turn on your grids by going to Settings > Photos & Camera > Turn on Grid. This will give you a nice 3 x 3 grids each time you fire up your camera app, which you can then use as a guide to make sure your subject is properly positioned and not crooked.

For @GirlEatWorld, I usually position the subject inside the two bottom middle boxes. For me, this creates the perfect subject to background ratio. This way I don’t overwhelm the background by taking a too-close picture of the food.

iPhone camera with Grid View Enabled

3. Pay attention to the lighting condition of your surrounding

If all else fails, this is the one photography tips you should remember. I always tell people that you cannot take your photos with your back against a light source – be it the sun, a lamp, anything that’s bright. There are some exceptions, such as if you’re taking a silhouette photo – like this photo below where I didn’t mind that the subject was covered by shadow because I wanted to bring more attention to the scenery in the background.

Currumbin Alley in Gold Coast

So next time you take a picture, make it a habit to see where the sun is and try to position yourself opposite of it. Which brings me to my next point…

4. Time of the day matters… a lot.

Though sometimes it can’t be helped, I don’t like taking photos in the middle of the day when the sun is directly on top of you. This tends to cast harsh shadows and it doesn’t look very flattering on photos. Instead, I prefer to take pictures in the morning or a few hours before sunset, where the sky tend to be more beautiful, colorful and the natural light are softer and gold/warm-toned. As such, in the photography world, this timeframe is often referred to as “Golden Hour“.

Singapore Sunset Rooftop Beer

There is also another terminology called “Magic Hour” which is right before sunrise or right after a sunset and tends to produce photos that are more even and whimsical. This was taken during Magic Hour of Boracay:

Boracay Sunset Magic Hour

And here is another one from a rooftop in Hong Kong

Sunset in Hong Kong Rooftop

Go the extra mile: Research ahead

If you’re traveling and planning to visit certain sites, try to research ahead of time where your subject is facing, then arrange your visit accordingly. For example: if your subject is facing east, then you definitely want to go in the morning to catch the morning golden hour. Pay attention to the weather forecast, and be patient if the sun doesn’t come out.

5. Make sure you get the focus and exposure right where you want it

This might be getting a bit technical… but my favorite iPhone camera feature is the tap-to-focus feature and AE/AF lock. AE stands for Automatic Exposure (how much light is in the image) and AF stands for Automatic Focus (where you want things to be sharper). This is really easy to achieve – all you have to do is tap on the subject you want to focus on, and give it a long press until a yellow box appears over your camera viewer. Like this:

iPhone camera with AE/AF Lock Enabled

You can then correct your composition until you get the perfect shot. Keep in mind that you must maintain the same distance from your subject once the lock has been activated. Changing the distance while the focus is locked will make your subject out of focus and you have to re-do the AE/AF lock.

Go the extra mile: Advanced Controls

In most lighting condition, AE/AF lock feature works well. However, for times when the light just refuses to work with me, I use an app called Camera+ for iPhone for further control of my photos. The app allows me to lock the focus and exposure separately. That way, while taking the photo you can arrange your focus and exposure points so that you don’t lose details to overexposure while still getting the focus correctly. For more info on these controls, this article explains it much better than I can!

5. Experiment with different angles and point of view

The other most important tip I have is: Move around and change your angles! Sometimes you just have to experiment with a different viewpoint to get the best shot.

Here, I try to illustrate several photos I took before settling on the one that I ended up posting on Instagram. The process didn’t actually take long at all (I believe it was about 5 minutes). I simply crossed the road, looked up, and thought that this was the better angle.

Photo Angles

Go the extra mile: Get inspirations from Instagram and other photographers

One thing I like to do before travel is to look through the geotag of a location I’m going to visit. I’m usually looking for photos that catch my eyes and bookmark them so that I can reference back to it when I actually visit the location. Then I either try to mimic the same angle or spin-off of my favorite photos for editing practice.

The image below is probably one of the most popular angles of People’s Park Complex in Singapore, but getting the shot itself and editing helped me hone my photo editing skills.

Singapore People Park Complex

Post-processing: Get the editing apps ready

Editing photos after it’s taken is generally referred to as “post-processing”. Even if the composition of the photo you originally took is off, sometimes a little post-processing can still help save it. As a rule of thumb, I try not to over-process photos because this causes the photo to appear less genuine. The most important thing about travel photos is that your image should appear crisp and clear, though this all depends on your own editing style.

1. The basic image editing tips

I use VSCO Cam and Instagram native app for all my editing purposes. They are both very simple apps and I believe they have the best filters and editing capabilities. The editing tools I love using is brightness/exposure and sharpness. I usually try to bump the sharpness to 50 – 70% and this really helps to make the image appear crisper. I also tend to prefer to adjust brightness and sharpness using Instagram more than VSCO as I feel Instagram gives a subtler edit.

As for the filter, I always go to VSCO. The filters I kept going back to is called A7, A8, C7 and C8. Whenever I apply a filter, I never go full strength as it might alter the photo too much, but a little bit (say, 40-50% strength) goes a long way to make the photo stand out in a subtle way.

Another tool I love and use a lot is from Instagram, called Lux effect. When used moderately, it does wonders to your images in bringing out more colors, sharpness, and textures. I used Lux effect on the photo below to help bring out the wooden texture of the building signage, as well as the folds of the jeans worn by the man.

Jewish Quarter in Krakow

2. Don’t be afraid to correct the alignment of your photos

As I said before, one of the styles I adore is symmetry. As such I’m a huge fan of the tilt/rotate, straighten, X-skew and Y-skew tool that you can find in most photography apps these days.

I use tilt/straighten to correct any crooked-ness within my photos – sometimes it doesn’t have to be perfectly straight, just to get it to a point where it feels more balanced. I use the X-skew and Y-skew for a similar reason – to bring more balance to the photos. Basically, the skew tools allow you to correct the perspective of your shot so that it appears more straight and pleasing to the eye. It could be that my image was slightly heavier to the right/left or top/bottom, and the skew tools could really make a difference.

This image I took in a train station in Berlin was originally slightly crooked and not very symmetrical as I took it at a slight angle, but using a combination of tilt, x-skew and y-skew I managed to make it look symmetrical.

Germany Train Station

Similarly, this shot of square tiles was near humanly impossible to be taken as straight as it looks because the tiles itself aren’t really straight in real life. I used the skew tools so that it looks like it’s taken from straight above.

Peranakan Tiles in Singapore

I also use rotate to get a creative with my photo angles. Take this image below for example – of course, this image was originally taken upright but I find that rotating it 180 degrees makes a much more interesting photo.

Singapore's People Park Complex

3. Minimize distractions

I use crop deliberately to frame my subject better. Cropping also helps to create a more zoomed-in effect, so the attention of your viewer is directed to where you want them to look.

This photo I took in Seoul was originally landscape, but I find that portrait orientation would help bring out the details more when viewed from a mobile phone. So I rotated the photo and made it portrait orientation instead, and cropped it for better focus.

Imperial Palace in Seoul

Similarly, this photo I took in Prague was also taken as landscape and from afar, but I wanted to highlight the building and the street itself, so I cropped it to look like it was taken from much closer.

Prague Old Town

I use FaceTune‘s whiten tool to help tone down the colors at a certain spot if I feel the image is already too distracting. In the photo of this image below, the color of the wooden table, paired with its rustic texture, took away too much attention from the main focus of the photo. So I toned down the color of the wooden table so that I can bring the viewer’s attention to the food and accessories on the table itself.

Brunch in Singapore

4. Don’t shy away from experimenting: Try adding borders and effects!

While I try not to post-process too much for photos on @GirlEatWorld, I REALLY go to town with photos I post to my personal Instagram (@ichabunni) which I treat as a photo editing playground.

If you scroll through my personal Instagram, you’ll see that my editing style changes from time to time. There was a period when I was obsessed with light leaks, a period of time where I used white borders on square photos, and there was another time where I alternate between horizontal and vertical photos with thick white borders.

This might not be for everyone, but I’ve been loving thick white border around my Instagram pictures. The app I use for adding a white border is Afterlight 2. I love this app because it preserves the geolocation from the original image, so when you post it on Instagram you can still geotag the location properly!

Sunshine Coast, Australia

I love how the white border makes my feed look like its hung in an art gallery. (Not saying my photos are art… but… you know…)

Hong Kong

At the end of the day, the single most important advice I can give you is to practice editing as many photos as you can. Eventually, you’ll find the style you like and editing will seem like a breeze as it becomes your second nature.

And that’s all I have to say about photo editing on mobile! Phew, that was quite long, wasn’t it? I hope it was worth the wait and that you find this post useful. Please leave me a comment below if you do, and if you want to know anything else – feel free to ask me!

Until next time.

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Filed under: Photography Tips

by Melissa

Hello! Welcome to Girl Eat World. I'm Melissa, the "Girl" in Girl Eat World. I run a popular Instagram account by the same name, @girleatworld, where I update my followers about my food and travel adventure. I love writing really long detailed blog posts about my travel experiences, which I'm guessing was how you ended up on this site! (Read more about me here)

Источник: https://girleatworld.net/how-i-edit-my-instagram-photos/

What Is Photo Editing?: A Definition

by Alexandra Sheehan on

The photoshoot is only the first half of creating a great image. A skilled photo editor can take a good RAW image and use a myriad of techniques to create a stunning final photo. Post-processing can enhance what you did capture and create effects that aren’t always possible in the photography studio.

This is especially true when it comes to ecommerce product photography that can seem creatively limiting. Curious about post-processing and how you can use it to improve your business?

Get a refresher on the definition of photo editing and learn about what a photo editor is and how to incorporate photo editing into your business.

In this article:

What is photo editing?: A definition

Photo editing is the act of altering an image. But that’s oversimplifying a subject that can be complex and employs different methods and tools.

For example, some photo editing techniques are done manually, while others are conducted through automated software. Some photo editing is even done offline, on actual photographs, posters or other printed collateral.

Other terms for photo editing:

  • Image editing
  • Post-processing
  • Image/photo manipulation
  • Photoshopping
  • Image/photo enhancement

Importance of photo editing

Editing helps you get the best image possible, as close to what you imagined when you took the photo (or better perhaps). Niche photographers can hone and emphasize their personal style. And for businesses, editing helps cement branding.

Photo editing is particularly important for ecommerce companies. The quality of the image directly affects people’s opinion of the product and sales numbers. Studies have confirmed that high-quality images outperform stock (or poorer quality) imagery and that increasing the number of high-quality images helps build trust with consumers and increases conversion rates.

What are the different types of photo editing?

There are many ways to edit a photo — some simple and others more complicated.

Most people can figure out simple photo-editing techniques on their own—though this does require time and patience. More complex adjustments may require a dedicated software program or a trained professional editor.

Simple photo-editing techniques include:

  1. Straighten: adjust the horizon of the photo
  2. Crop: trimming out a portion (usually peripheral) of the image to help draw attention to the subject or otherwise improve the composition
  3. Resize: adjust the dimensions of the image
  4. Sharpen: enhance the definition of the edges in an image (will not make a blurry image in-focus).
  5. Noisereduction: smoothing the picture out, typically accomplished by reducing the pixel size
  6. Whitebalance: the color of the light in the image
  7. Contrast: higher contrast makes an image more punchy, while lower contrast makes it flatter in color
  8. Exposure: the brightness of the photo
  9. Lenscorrection: lessens the effect(s) of the camera lens
  10. Color adjustments: change the color of an item or element in the photo
  11. Background removal: delete the background from the image, isolating the subject (this is often used for white background product photography)

More complex techniques include:

  • Clipping paths: vector path that differentiates the part of the image that’s visible and the part that’s transparent (extracts a subject or element from an image)
  • Portrait corrections: complexion touch-ups and enhancements
  • Drop and reflection shadow: create and adjust shadows
  • Special effects: this can mean an array of things, from animation to adding weather conditions like fog or snow
  • Adjusting text and visuals: add overlays or manipulate what’s already there
  • Photo stitching: when you seamlessly put two images together to make it look as though they were shot that way
  • Photo masking and Layers: the process of hiding and revealing specified portions of an image

Pixel editing and parametric image editing

Two methods of digital photo editing are pixel editing and parametric image editing. Let’s look at their definitions:

What is pixel editing?

Pixel editing, or pixel-level editing, is when you alter an image at the pixel level. Because you’re altering the pixels themselves, this also permanently changes the image file. That’s why pixel editing is considered a destructive form of photo editing because it’s not as easy to undo the changes and restore the original file.

Pixel editing allows you to make extremely detailed edits and accomplish certain functions that parametric image editing can’t (like CMYK color modes, for example).

What is parametric image editing?

Parametric image editing (PIE) doesn’t change the pixels of the image. Instead, these edits are recorded as a set of steps to follow to accomplish the final look. Thus, it’s a non-destructive mode of photo editing. However, PIE doesn’t always allow for all types of edits.

Many in the industry recommend starting with PIE, and then using pixel editing to refine the final details.

Photo-editing history

Examples of photo editing

There are so many ways to edit photos, and everyone has a unique approach. You might see examples of photo editing on social media, like this video on Instagram showing how to edit using Picsart.

Here are a few tutorials that walk you through the photo-editing process on your own:

Editing product photos

Product images will almost always require or benefit from post-processing. One of the main things you want to be mindful of is consistency, especially if you’re working on multiple products for the same company or are providing several types of photos of the same product.

Visuals help market brands and sell products, but you should also think about where the image will be used. Is it for an advertisement, ecommerce page, social media, or a print catalog? A white background shot will call for much different edits than an image for a Facebook ad. Likely, you’ll be able to get more creative with advertising imagery.

Here are some of the most common types of edits for product photography:

Image source

  • Brightness and exposure: If you didn’t nail the lighting, you can make substantial adjustments post-shoot.
  • Background removal: This is a super-common edit for product photos, especially if you’re listing the item on Amazon, which has a white background requirement. Regardless, white background maintains consistency.
  • Color correction: It’s important that product photos portray the item as accurately as possible so it’s a smart idea to color correct all of your product images. As many as 64% of returns happen because the product didn’t match customer expectations based on product images and descriptions.
  • Colorchange: For products that come in several colors, it’s important to showcase the variety. Instead of photographing the product in every color, photo editors can make the changes post shoot.

Learn how to edit your photos

If you’re ready to learn how to edit your own photos, we’ve put together a handy collection of Photoshop tutorials. Here are a few we recommend you get started with:

What is a professional photo editor?

A person who edits images can either be self-employed, contracted by an outsourced company or agency, or someone who works in-house. There are many possible job titles for a photo editor, including digital photo editor, graphic designer or art director, among others.

Typically, photo editors specialize in specific industries, much like photographers. For example, real estate, editorial, and product photography all come with their own set of trends and intricacies. Editors that focus on ecommerce images know just how to make products pop.

Tackling photo-editing for product photography

Learning new photo-editing techniques can be an enjoyable way to break up your day and add to your industry knowledge, but editing photos can be time-consuming, especially if photography is your specialty. If you need fast, affordable, high-quality photo-editing services, the professionals at Path are here to help.

Alexandra Sheehan

In her past agency life, Alex has led digital marketing initiatives for Fortune 500 companies. Now, she’s passionate about helping retailers and retail industry leaders harness the power of the written word and fuse it with strategic content, email and social media marketing campaigns.

Источник: https://pathedits.com/blogs/tips/what-is-photo-editing

PhotoPad Photo Editing Software

Edit your photos and images easily

Easy picture enhancing tools for beginners and advanced tools for professionals

Editing ToolsCrop, rotate, resize, flip

Effects & FiltersColor filters, vignette, warp

Creative extrasCollage, embroidery, paint

Retouch ToolsAuto fix, touch up, noise

Clipart LibraryFree clipart library

Drawing and TextCaptions, draw tool, borders

PhotoPad picture editor is the fastest and most fun way to edit your digital photos. PhotoPad is one of the most stable, easy-to-use, and comprehensive photo editors available.

  • Convert your photo to a paint by numbers pattern
  • Convert photos to oil paintings for a great effect
  • Have fun with the photo to cartoon effect
  • Easily edit digital photos and other pictures
  • Supports all popular image formats
  • Crop, rotate, resize and flip photos fast

PhotoPad is designed to be ready to open and edit your photos quickly.

Whether you’re a professional photographer or just want to edit your personal photos, PhotoPad is one of the best photo editors on the market today with all the powerful tools and features you need.

Get it Free. PhotoPad free photo editing software is available for non-commercial use only. If you will be using PhotoPad at home, you can download the free version here. No signup required.

See photo editing software screenshots >>>
Photo Editing Features
  • Crop, rotate, resize and flip pictures
  • Touch up photos to remove blemishes and fix color
  • Improve photo quality and focus with blur, sharpening and noise reduction tools
  • Adjust the color balance, exposure, levels, brightness, contrast and more
  • Merge multiple exposures to create stunning HDR photographs
  • Load JPG, GIF, PNG, TIFF, BMP, and other popular image formats
  • Resize your image utilizing machine learning and AI for the best quality with super resolution
  • Change the aspect ratio of an image without distorting key features using the liquid resize effect
  • Easily undo, re-order and edit existing effects on the layers list using non-destructive editing
  • Toggle layer visibility to review an edit
  • Take and edit screenshots of your desktop
  • Replace green screen photo backgrounds
  • Automatically add color to black and white photos using machine learning technology with Super Color
  • Create passport photos with the passport photo tool
Image Editing Features
  • Apply photo effects, including oil paint, cartoon, vignette, sepia and many more
  • Create collages and photo mosaics with your photographs
  • Use preset filters to easily enhance your photos
  • Convert your photo to cross stitch patterns, paint by numbers or add an oil painting effect
  • Add text and captions to photos to post online, add to photo books or to create a new viral meme
  • Insert clipart from the included clipart library
  • Add frames and borders around your photographs
  • Upload edited pictures directly to Twitter, Flickr, Dropbox or Google Drive
  • Adjust the opacity of a layer to finesse an edit
  • Use censor effect to hide or blur faces or text
  • Create and edit thumbnails for YouTube videos and social media stories
  • Add effects and filters in a couple of clicks
Brightness and Contrast
Sometimes photos turn out either too bright or too dark. The Brightnessand Contrasttools let you make simple adjustments to the tonal range of an image.

Resize and Crop
Use the Croptool to make a rectangular photo square or to focus on one portion of your photograph. It's also easy to resize your photo for the web or for print using the resize tool.

Straighten
Fix tilted horizon or a crooked photo with the Straightentool.

Regional Effects
Regional Effectsis a powerful tool which gives you the ability to apply effects and filters to selected portions of your photo. Select a part of your image and apply an effect or use the paint brush to paint an effect onto part of your picture.

HDR Images
Easily combine several differently exposed photographs into one HDRimage.

Background Replacement
Use Selectionand Backgroundtools to replace the background in your photos with transparency, color or another image.

Resize with Super Resolution
PhotoPad uses AI and Machine Learning when resizing your pictures to a higher resolution. Upscale your pictures while maintaining dazzling image quality. Enhance photo size and resolution.

Collage
Use the Collagetool to combine different photos in an organized layout. Select from one of the pre-designed layouts or design your own collage with the freeform layout. Select a background color or pattern and more.

Retouch Photos
Remove red eyes, stamp out blemishes, whiten teeth and more with our easy to use touch-up tools.

Источник: https://www.nchsoftware.com/photoeditor/index.html

The best photo-editing software in 2021

The best photo-editing software can turn a mediocre photo into something impressive, and make a great photo spectacular. It allows you to do everything from making subtle tweaks to colour or saturation to the application of filters, removal of blemishes or even wholesale transformations. 

There's a huge range of options out there these days, so to save you from having to try them all, we've rounded up all of the best photo-editing software into one handy guide. Some of the software below is desktop only, while other programmes work in your browser, on a tablet, or even on your smartphone. Our guide covers every price point and ability level, so you're sure to find the best photo-editing software for your needs.

If you specifically need to edit on the go, see our guide to the best photo apps, and if you want to be able to view your images at their best, don't miss our buying guide to the best laptops for photo editing. Meanwhile, read on for the best photo-editing software available now. Find quick links to our top three options below, or scroll down further for our full guide.

The best photo-editing software: our top 3

The best photo-editing software available now

There's no doubt that the latest edition of Photoshop is among the best photo-editing software available. Photoshop CC is astoundingly good, and it has too many great features to summarise in this small space. You can read all about it in our Photoshop CC 2020 review and explore its capabilities further in our roundup of the best Photoshop tutorials. 

You can soup up the software with a selection of free Photoshop brushes and simplify long-winded processes thanks to all the free Photoshop actions available. The monthly cost is not insignificant, so check the best Adobe deals to make sure you don't miss a bargain on a Creative Cloud subscription.

02. Affinity Photo

The best photo-editing software with a one-off fee

Specifications

Platform: Windows, MacOS, iOS (iPad only)

Developer: Serif

Price: $19.99/£19.99 (iPad) / $49.99/£48.99 (desktop)

Reasons to buy

+One-off fee+Comprehensive features

Reasons to avoid

-Empty List

Affinity Photo is a professional-standard photo-editing programme without the high price tag. Its impressive toolset covers digital painting, raw editing, professional retouching and the creation of multi-layered compositions. Other features include advanced lens corrections and best-in-class noise reduction, which allow complete control over images with quality results.

The software is also available as a dedicated iPad app. The first professional photo-editing tool to cater to the tablet, it was named Apple App of the year in 2017. Serif also has a graphic design package (Affinity Designer) and a desktop publishing app (Affinity Publisher) to cover other creative requirements.

CyberLink PhotoDirector 365 offers many of the standard image editing tools and features and throws in some artificially intelligent tricks, such as automatic body shaping, skin and face tools, and some lighting and animation effects. The interface is user friendly enough for anyone who's used to working in the digital space, and it's fast and reliable.

The tool has its flaws, with typos and little glitches that might dissuade power users. That said, the cheap monthly subscription and high-level editing features such as levels and colour adjustment make this a decent option for creatives that occasionally need dedicated software to edit images and don't want to break the bank. For more information, see our CyberLink PhotoDirector 365 review.

04. Luminar AI

Faster photo-editing from Skylum

Specifications

Platform: Windows, MacOS

Developer: Skylum

Price: $79/£79

Reasons to buy

+Lots of tools+Uses AI

Reasons to avoid

-Limited export options

Skylum Luminar AI aims to speed up photo editing so photographers can spend more time creating, and we have to say it does that very well. It uses artificial intelligence to suggest editing options that can enhance photos of different styles. It can suggest the best templates to improve images and has tools that can be used to easily tweak skies, accents, skin, faces and even eyes. With a very reasonable one-off cost, this AI-based software is certainly worth checking out.

05. inPixio Photo Studio 11

A great value intuitive photo editor

Specifications

Platform: Windows, MacOS

Developer: inPixio

Price: Regular: $49, Pro: $79

Reasons to buy

+Very simple and intuitive to use+Great value for money+Strong performance with minimal system requirements+Comprehensive tools for RAW editing

Reasons to avoid

-Quite limited photo management tools-Sky replacement doesn't always look realistic

InPixio Photo Studio is another option that offers a lot of bang for our buck. It's intuitive and easy to use, and performs extremely well for the price and system requirements. Version 11 adds in a host of new features including sky replacement (useful, if not always the most realistic it could be), and background blur in the Pro edition, plus improved UI and new photo montage content in both the Regular and Pro editions. 

The ease of use makes this one of the most accessible full-featured photo editors for beginners, allowing quick modifications to be made in no time at all. The AI background eraser and improved cutout tool are particularly useful for making very rapid cutouts. With the Pro version, you also get inPixio's Photo Maximiser for enlarging and Photo Focus for sharpening, two job-specific tools that can be used separately.

06. Pixlr X / Pixlr E

The best browser-based photo-editing software

Specifications

Platform: Browser

Developer: Autodesk Inc

Price: Free

Reasons to buy

+Easy to use+Dropbox integration

Reasons to avoid

-Empty List

Pixlr X and Pixlr E are fast and easy to use, whether on a web or mobile browser. Pixlr X has a useful functionality that allows you to make non-destructive edits to your images, letting you change and fine-tune every edit at any time. Another plus is that you can use the programme within Dropbox, which makes it a great addition to your toolkit for collaborative work. It offers the usual adjustments, filters and texts that will be familiar to Pixlr users and are sure to delight newcomers. Pixlr E offers the same classic photo-editing tools with the addition of some extras for the pros.

06. Corel PaintShop Pro

The best photo-editing software for those on a budget

Specifications

Platform: Windows

Developer: Corel

Price: $69/£69.99

Reasons to buy

+Includes graphic design features+One-off fee

Reasons to avoid

-Empty List

Corel PaintShop Pro has been the budget alternative to Photoshop for PC users for more than two decades, and it's still going strong. The 2021 edition promises to be the fastest, easiest to use and more creative version yet. 

If you can stretch to pay a little more than the price for the standard version, there's also PaintShop Pro 2021 Ultimate, which has been upgraded to include a Refine brush and a dedicated photography workspace.

07. Adobe Lightroom CC

The best photo-editing software for beginners

Specifications

Platform: Windows, MacOS, iOS, Android

Developer: Adobe

Price: $9.99/£9.98 (per month)

Reasons to buy

+Good for beginners+Not as complete as Photoshop

Reasons to avoid

-Empty List

Adobe Lightroom is among the best photo-editing software for beginners. It helps you to organise your work by letting keep all of your photography in one place, edit it and share it from anywhere. Many experienced creatives also choose to use Lightroom because it can easily handle complicated image management jobs that Photoshop isn't designed for – it makes light work of day-to-day enhancements and raw files.

You can store images on your computer, iPad, iPhone or Android device and even transfer photos automatically from your phone into Lightroom as you take them. Syncing is automatic, so when you make an edit or flag an image as a favourite in one place, it updates everywhere else too.

08. Photoshop Elements

Another simple, beginner-friendly photo-editing tool

Specifications

Platform: Windows, MacOS, Linux

Developer: Adobe

Price: $99.99 /£86.56

Reasons to buy

+One-off fee+Decent AI tools

Reasons to avoid

-Empty List

Photoshop Elements is a more basic alternative to Photoshop CC. Its handy Quick and Guided Edit modes make it great for beginners, but that doesn't mean it lacks power. 

The 2021 version includes Auto Creations, a collage tool that scans and groups photos automatically or via the tagging and sorting tool Adobe Sensei. It also comes with a range of performance enhancements and upgrades – see our Photoshop Elements 2019 review for more about the software. One plus over Photoshop CC is that Elements doesn't require a subscription.

DxO PhotoLabis a much more specific tool. It's really just a raw converter, but it's perhaps the best raw converter going. It's a specialist, slightly complex tool to use, but it achieves impeccable results. You can browse images on your computer folder by folder, then select an image and choose from the default conversion/correction setting or a range of presets. 

The software offers lens corrections that automatically compensate for the different degrees of distortion, chromatic aberration, edge softness and vignetting that are common to most digital camera lenses. The results are outstanding, although this could never be the only image-editing tool you use.

10. Pixelmator

Great photo-editing software for Mac users

Specifications

Platform: MacOS

Developer: Pixelmator

Price: $29.99/£28.99

Reasons to buy

+Support for M1 Macs+New design

Reasons to avoid

-Empty List

Pixelmator uses Mac OS X libraries for fast, powerful image editing. It allows seamless integration with iPhoto and Aperture, as well as iCloud. There are also built-in export tools for Facebook and Flickr.

Colour correction tools include Hue/Saturation, Shadows/Highlights and Contrast and Pixelmator supports filters – it comes with 150 to experiment with. You can also open and save images in many popular formats, including PSD, TIFF, PDF and PNG. Layers are preserved in Photoshop documents, which lets you collaborate with colleagues who use Adobe's software. A recent update also adds compatibility with Apple's M1-powered machines.

11. Fotor

A useful free photo editor

Specifications

Platform: Web browser, Windows, MacOS, iOS, Android

Developer: Everimagining

Price: Free

Reasons to buy

+Simple interface+Free to use

Reasons to avoid

-Empty List

Fotor comes in mobile, web and desktop version, so there's a suitable option available whether you're at your desk or out and about. The software features a full suite of tools that should cover the majority of immediate editing requirements. 

A one-tap enhance button aims to offer an instant fix, which will be loved by some and hated by others. More control is offered via tools for resizing, cropping, rotating and straightening images. There's also a background remover and some handy retouching tools such as red-eye and wrinkle removal. There's even an HDR image creator and tilt-shift editor in case you're looking to turn your photos into something more dramatic.

12. GIMP

Free, open-source photo-editing software

Specifications

Platform: Windows, MacOS, Linux

Developer: GIMP

Price: Free

Reasons to buy

+Free+Not that user friendly

Reasons to avoid

-Empty List

GIMP is another free photo-editing tool. This open-source photo editor debuted on Unix-based platforms and now offers versions for Linux, Windows and Mac. GIMP, which stands for GNU Image Manipulation Program, offers a broad range of tools including painting tools, colour correction, cloning, selection, and enhancement.

The development team has worked hard to ensure compatibility, so you'll be able to work with all the popular file formats without problems. The software also boasts a very capable file manager built in, similar to Adobe's Bridge.

13. Sumo Paint

Another good in-browser photo-editor

Specifications

Platform: Web browser

Developer: Sumoware

Price: Free for basic online version

Reasons to buy

+In browser editing

Reasons to avoid

-Empty List

Sumo Paint is another very capable browser-based image editor. It boasts all of the standard features you'd expect in a desktop tool – in fact, the Pro version for $9 a month includes the option to download a desktop version if you prefer. 

Tools include brushes, pencils, shapes, text, cloning and gradients, which can all be accessed quickly from a Photoshop-like floating toolbar. Sumo Paint can open saved documents from your hard drive, making it a viable option for editing and re-editing, and its latest upgrade gives it a slick look. There are significant limitations, though. The editor appears to be RGB only, limiting its use to work designed for screens. There are No CMYK, Lab or other colour models offered.

Related articles:

Beren Neale is the deals editor at Creative Bloq. After editing several creative and design magazines - including the graphic design mag Computer Arts - he found his home on the biggest global art and design website, helping digital creatives get the best deals on the kit that they need. 

Источник: https://www.creativebloq.com/features/photo-editing-software

HP Image Editor - Editing Images in the HP Imaging Software

HP Image Editor icons

Figure : HP Image Editor

Use the icons in the HP Image Editor window to rotate, resize, adjust colors, adjust brightness and contrast, sharpen, remove red-eye, and add titles to images.

Using the Rotate icon

Figure : Rotate menu

Rotating the image.
  1. With an image open, click the Rotate icon. The image opens on the left side of the screen.

  2. Rotate the image using one or both of the following methods
    • Click the appropriate icon to rotate the image 90 degrees left or right.

    • Move the slider bar to rotate the image up to 45 degrees to the left or the right.
  3. When the image has been rotated to the desired position, click OK and then click Save or Save As to save to image.

    Click Cancel to disregard the changes.

Using the Resize icon

Figure : Resize menu

Resizing the image.
  1. With an image open, click the Resize icon. The Resize options display on the left side of the screen.

  2. Use the down arrow in the Units box to select what unit of measurement to use when displaying the image. The available choices are centimeters, inches, pixels, and percent values.

  3. Checking the Keep original proportioncheckbox allows the image to remain in proportion when manually changing just the height or width.
    note:

    If the resolution of the image is decreased, the physical size of the image changes as well. For example, if a 4x6 inch image is changed from 200 dpi to 100 dpi, the image will no longer be 4x6 inches. It will be much smaller. It is important to set the desired resolution before resizing an image.

  4. If the Resample box is checked, the image will be rescanned.

  5. Enter the desired resolution of the image in the Resolution box.

  6. Click OK to accept the changes.

    Click Reset to return the image back to its original size.

    Click Cancel to discard all changes.

Using the Colors icon

Figure : Adjust Color menu

Adjusting the colors of an image.
  1. With an image open, click the Colors icon. The image displays on the left side of the screen. There is a preview window to show adjustments as they are made.

  2. Change the color of the image with the slider bar (move the bar to the far left side for more Blue –180 and the far right side for more Green +180).

  3. Adjust the color saturation of your image with the slider bar (far left is –100 and far right is +100).

  4. Click OK to accept the changes.

    Click Reset to return the image back to its original size.

    Click Cancel to discard all changes.

Using the Brightness icon

Figure : Brightness/Contrast menu

Adjusting the brightness of the image.
  1. With an image open, click the Brightness icon. The image displays on the left side of the screen. There is a preview window to show adjustments as they are made.

  2. Below the preview window is a Slider Bar for Brightness (move to the far left is –100 and to the right is +100).

  3. Next is a Slider Bar for Contrast (move to the far left is –100 and to the right is +100).

  4. Click OK to accept the changes.

    Click Reset to return the image back to its original size.

    Click Cancel to discard all changes.

Using the Sharpen icon

Figure : Adjust Sharpness menu

Adjusting the sharpness of an image
  1. With an image open, click the Sharpen icon. The image displays on the left side of the screen. There is a preview window to show adjustments as they are made.

  2. Using the Slider Bar for Sharpness, move to the left for –100 and to the right for +100).

  3. Click OK to accept the changes.

    Click Reset to return the image back to its original size.

    Click Cancel to discard all changes.

Using the Red eye icon

Figure : Remove Red Eye menu

Removing red eye for the image.
  1. With an image open, click the Red Eye icon. On the left side of the window are options to make adjustments for Darker or Lighter to remove red eye on a specified location in the image.

  2. There is a Darker/Lighter Slider Bar for more control. After making adjustment on the slider bar, left click the "red eye" in the image to make the edit.

  3. After making the edits, click OK to accept the changes.

    Click Undo to undo any changes.

    Click Cancel to close the Red Eye Edit Screen without saving any changes.

Using the Add Title icon

Figure : Add Title menu

Adding a title to the image.
  1. With an image open, click the Add Title icon. On the left side of the window are options to add text to an image (the text is updated on the right side image for preview).

  2. Click in the white Add Title box and type the desired text.

  3. Use the Font and Color buttons to adjust the color and style of the typed text.

  4. The Circle in the center of the navigational arrows places the text in the center of the image.
    • Click the arrow that points up to place the text at the top of the image.

    • Click the arrow that points right to place the text at the right side of the image.

    • Click the arrow that points down to place the text at the bottom of the image.

    • Click the arrow that points left to place the text at the left side of the image.

    • Use the buttons with the letter A in them to change the characteristics of the type text.
  5. Click OK to accept the changes.

    Click Reset to return the image back to its original size.

    Click Cancel to discard all changes.

Using the File Menu

Figure : File menu

Using the items under the File menu.
  • Clicking Open allows opening an image from a file.

  • Clicking Close closes the current open window.

  • Clicking Save saves the current file.

  • Clicking Save As saves the current image as a different file, leaving the original file unchanged.

  • Clicking Print Setup allows changes to be made in the printers properties.

  • Clicking Print Preview viewing the image before it is printed.

  • Clicking Print opens the printer properties pages and allows printing.

  • Clicking Exit closes the Image Editor application.

Using the Edit Menu

Figure : Edit menu

Using the items under the Edit menu.
  • Clicking Undo cancels the last change made to an image.

  • Clicking Cut removes a selected area and copies it to the clipboard.

  • Clicking Copy copies a selected area and places it on the clipboard, leaving the original image unchanged.

  • Clicking Paste places the item copied to the clipboard onto the image.

  • Clicking Crop allows the selection of a specific area in an area to be selected. The remainder of the image is discarded.

  • Clicking Delete deletes the selected area.

  • Clicking Select All selects the entire image along with any text or edits made to the image.

  • Clicking Select Area allows the selection a specific area in the image to edit.

  • Clicking Select Object this option allows changes to the entire image.

Using the View Menu

Figure : View menu

Using the items under the View menu.
  • Clicking Zoom in zooms in on the image.

  • Clicking Zoom out zooms out from the image.

  • Clicking Next page changes the view to the next page when working with multiple files.

  • Clicking Previous page changes the view to the previous page when working with multiple files.

  • Clicking Annotation Toolbar displays the annotation toolbar on the right side of the Editor Window.

  • Clicking Main Toolbars displays the Main Toolbars on the Editor Window.

  • Clicking Status Bar displays the status on the bottom of the Editor Window.

  • The Thumbnails view is not available here (it is used to view the details/thumbnails etc.).

  • Clicking Image Properties displays all information available about the selected image, such as size, dimensions, and dpi.

Using the Image Menu

Figure : Image menu

Using the items under the Image menu.
  • Clicking Rotate allows the rotation of the image.

  • Clicking Resize allows changing the physical dimensions of the image.

  • Clicking Adjust Color allows adjusting the colors in the image.

  • Clicking Adjust Brightness/Contrast allows changing the brightness of an image.

  • Clicking Adjust Sharpness allows changing the sharpness of an image.

  • Clicking Remove Red Eye removes red eye from subjects in an image.

  • Clicking Add Title allows adding text to an image.

  • Clicking Flip Right to Left flips the image right to left.

  • Clicking Flip Top to Bottom flips the image top to bottom.

  • Clicking Black and White Deskew straightens a slanted image containing text by +/- 15°. If Deskew does not work properly for the image, try rotating the image manually with the Rotate Tool.

Using the Annotate Menu

Figure : Annotate Menu

Using the items under the Annotate menu.
  • Clicking Sticky Note places a sticky note on the image.

  • Clicking Text allows placing text on the image.

  • Clicking Highlight allows highlighting parts of an image.

  • Clicking Line places a line in a specific location on the image.

  • Clicking Rectangle places a rectangle in a specific location on the image.

  • Clicking Bitmap places a bitmap image in a specific location over the image.

Using the Layout Menu

Figure : Layout Menu

Using the items under the Layout menu.
  • Clicking Align Objects aligns all the objects.

  • Clicking Make Same Size allows making all edits the same size on the image.

  • Clicking Move To Front brings the selected item forward (super imposed over the top of what is already there).

  • Clicking Move To Back moves the selected item behind the image.

Using the Help Menu

Figure : Help menu

Using the items under the Help menu.
  • Clicking Help Topics opens the help file allowing searches through the index tab for a specific question or browsing through the contents of the help files.

  • Clicking About HP Image Editor displays the version and available information about the version of HP Image Editor in use.

Источник: https://support.hp.com/wps/portal/pps/Home/ConcentraWrapper/!ut/p/z0/04_Sj9CPykssy0xPLMnMz0vMAfIjo8zifQ08DYy83A283YODjQ0cnUMsfAPcjQwM3A31C7IdFQFrWXz6/

How to Edit Photos Without Photoshop

It seems like every day a new photo editing program pops up promising new effects, new frames, and new ways to add mustaches to your photos. What a time to be alive!

But what if you want to do something more complex, like remove the background from a product photo, combine pictures, or take away a few wrinkles? In those cases, you’ll arrive at an advanced image editor like Photoshop.

Photoshop is powerful software with a lot of loyal and happy users. The problem is, it’s tough for beginners to learn, and it’s expensive too.

Fortunately, there are lots of low-cost or free Photoshop alternatives that can help. In this post, I’ll go over some of the best online photo editors for beginners. 

Tools to edit photos without Photoshop

  1. GIMP: Free, open-source photo editor similar to Photoshop.
  2. Pixlr E: Free Photoshop tool that doesn’t need a download.
  3. PicMonkey: Powerful image editor easier than Photoshop (starts at $8/mo, $12/mo for background removal tool).
  4. Canva: Online tool for social media images with text and graphics. ($12/mo for background removal tool.)
  5. Pixlr BG: Free tool to remove the background of an image.
  6. Tucia: Professional photo editing service to fix photos for you. Pay per image with no subscriptions. 

All of these Photoshop alternatives work for Windows and Mac.

Just looking for a way to edit images to create your logo? Try our Jimdo Logo Creator.

Design a logo that makes your business stand out.

1. Free photo editors similar to Photoshop  

Who are they for? Someone who knows a little bit about editing photos already, or is game to figure it out.

These free alternatives to Photoshop are a great option that many people don’t know about. They can still layer and combine photos, or add or remove someone from a picture, all without Photoshop. The downside? They look and feel very similar to the real deal. So if you hate using Photoshop, go ahead and scroll down to Option 2. 

GIMP (Free)

GIMP is an open source and completely free photo editor that could be Photoshop’s long lost twin. You don’t get a fancy interface, but you do get free access to a very powerful program that can do just about anything you need. You also get lots of tutorials from the community, many languages, and the warm and fuzzy feeling that you are supporting an open-source and volunteer-run project.

Pixlr (Free)

Pixlr is a pretty robust free photo editor that’s actually a web app, so whether you have Windows or a Mac, you don’t need to download any software. You just use it right in your browser. I like that they don’t require you to create an account or jump through hoops to download your images. And when you save an image, it’s very easy to adjust the image size and file size to optimize it for your website. 

There are two free versions: Pixlr X and Pixlr E. Pixlr X is the easiest, most basic. It’s closer to the photo editing software you might find in Windows or iOS. Pixlr E is more advanced. It has layers and tools similar to Photoshop. (You can also upgrade to Pixlr Pro for $7.99/mo to get more features and get rid of the ads). 

One look at Pixlr E and you’ll see how closely it matches the Photoshop interface. 

A screenshot from the Pixlr E photo editor.

A common complaint about Pixlr is that it has the same steep learning curve as Photoshop, and not a lot of support to go with it (it is free, after all). However with a little digging you’ll see that their blog is actually full of good articles. Google “How do I ____ in Pixlr?” and a helpful tutorial will likely pop up in the results. Another plus is that the editor is available in almost 30 languages.

Runner up: Fotor 

Fotor calls itself “fundamentally Photoshop online” and is available in 8 languages. You can try it for free but you can’t remove the watermark without a Pro plan, which is $8/mo. I also found the background removal tool difficult to use.

2. Online photo editors different from Photoshop

Who are they for? Someone who needs to do advanced photo edits, but doesn’t want to use a complicated program like Photoshop.

When you start looking at Photoshop alternatives, you’ll see that most programs try to copy the Photoshop experience, from layers to lasso tools. If you happen to hate that experience, you’ll want to find a powerful tool with a simple process. That’s where I recommend PicMonkey.

PicMonkey ($)

PicMonkey is an easy image editor with a focus on the kinds of edits that people typically want to make, like fixing up someone’s complexion or adding fun effects for different holidays. Best of all, its buttons are labeled in plain English instead of with mysterious icons, and helpful popups tell you exactly how to use each tool. Currently it’s available in English and Spanish. 

That said, it’s $8/mo, so probably only worth it if you know you’re going to use it a lot. If you’re on the fence, consider a free trial to test it out or even just edit one sample photo to see what the tool is like. Similar to other popular graphic design tools, PicMonkey has a ton of templates, fonts, and other fun things for branding and marketing. 

A screenshot of the PicMonkey photo editor.

Runner-up: Canva

Canva is a great graphic design program for beginners. I don’t have it as a top pick here because I find that it’s less of an alternative to Photoshop and more for creating social media-friendly images with text and other graphics. It has a ton of trendy templates for every business-related piece of marketing you’d probably ever need. But its photo editing tools are fairly basic. It’s available for free, but you have to upgrade to the paid plan ($12.95/mo) to use the background removal tool. 

3. How to remove an image background without Photoshop

Who are they for? Someone who just wants to remove the background from an image.

Removing the background of an image isreally handy for product photos or icons. But it’s surprisingly tricky without the Photoshop lasso tool.

An example of removing the background of an image and using it on your website.

Most background erasers work the same way. You upload your image and mark the part you want in green and the background in red. Then the software takes over and cuts the image out for you—with varying levels of success depending on how clear the boundaries are between your object and your background. Then you get a chance to touch it up yourself.

Pixlr BG (Free)

Pixlr BG wasn’t available the last time I wrote on this topic, but it’s my new favorite free background remover. It’s genuinely free—you don’t need an account and there are no tricks or limitations that you get with other tools. Most importantly, it works really well! Its “AI Cutout” technology worked automatically on the dog photo without me needing to painstakingly trace an outline with my mouse. I just needed to touch it up slightly, and the tool made this process easy and intuitive. 

Runner up: Background Burner

When I first wrote about these programs a few years ago, I recommended Background Burner. It still works well and it’s still free. The only catch is that you have to create an account with Bonanza, an online retailer, in order to download your images, and its interface isn’t as nice. So that’s why I think Pixlr BG is now the best free background eraser. 

Tip: For more step-by-step tips, check out our Beginner’s Guide to Customizing Your Jimdo Website.

Paid tools to remove photo backgrounds

I didn’t have any trouble with the free version of Pixlr, but there are also paid alternatives to Photoshop if you want to clip something out of an image. They all work the same way but have different pricing.

  • Autoclipping: Pay as you go or get a monthly subscription, depending on how many images you plan on downloading. There’s also a free version for non-commercial use.
  • ClippingMagic: This tool works really well. The lowest package is $3.99/mo for 15 credits, which translates to 15 downloaded images. The nice thing is you can re-edit and re-download an image without it counting as another credit.
  • PicMonkey has a background eraser tool included in their Pro plans ($13/mo).

4. How to find a professional photo editing service

Who are they for? Someone who wants to outsource their photo editing. 

Hey, not all of us are into editing photos. Maybe you have a ton of product photos for your online store, or you’re trying to outsource more tasks so you can focus on your top priorities. If that’s the case, there are services that will edit your photos for you—from simple edits to more complex effects. Here are some options:

Pixelz Solo ($)

Pixelz is a nice professional option that specializes in ecommerce photos. They’ll help you with backgrounds, make sure everything is cropped consistently, and even provide invisible mannequins. The subscription starts at $9/mo and then you pay about $1.50 for each image. The turnaround time is 48 hours.  

Tucia ($)

Tucia is one of the largest online photo retouching services. At $8/image for basic fixes and $40/image for advanced effects, this could be worth it if you want to turn a photo into a high-impact website background image or if you have a headshot that needs some retouching. You pay per image, so you’re not locked into any monthly subscription. 


Don’t be discouraged by Photoshop’s tricky interface or high price. There are still lots of ways to edit photos for your website. Give some of these options a try, and see what you think! Also check out our tips for optimizing your photos for both your design and your SEO, and our favorite sources for free stock photography online.

Bring your business online with Jimdo.

Источник: https://www.jimdo.com/blog/how-to-edit-photos-without-photoshop/

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Best photo editing apps for astrophotography

The best photo editing apps can bring out hidden elements in your astro images, transforming them into real showstoppers. This isn't cheating, just enhancing – remember, astrophotos are never going to be the same as what the photographer saw with their naked eye. How could they be? We see the night sky as a series of point light sources punctuated by the occasional Moon, while the best cameras for astrophotography can show us the much fainter glows of nebulae and galaxies. Even the best telescopes and best binoculars can't reveal all the subtle colors and patterns that are brought alive in these enhanced images.

Astrophotographers rely, therefore, on editing – especially since photography went digital. Whether they try to do as much in-camera as is possible, or lean more heavily on their editing software to extract the unseen beauty from their images, there's always an element of editing involved. Take stacking, for example. The only way you can align and stack a large number of digital files to combine their captured light and reveal the deep-sky object you’re trying to image is through editing software. Tweaks to brightness, color, and contrast are editing too, as is a simple crop to more closely centre your intended target in the frame.

As a result of image editing software’s popularity with the digital photography community, there are a lot of different applications on the market, each with their varying pros and cons, especially where astrophotography is concerned. It’s worth noting that none of these is a dedicated astro-processing app. This is off-the-shelf software that can be bent to the needs of the astrophotographer, and some handle this better than others. Here are some of the best we’ve found.

Adobe Lightroom: Best photo editing app overall

Adobe Lightroom

Our top-rated editing app, Lightroom has a brilliant workflow that will suit busy photographers and it boasts reams of editing features, too.

Specifications

Payment type: Subscription

Compatibility: Windows, Mac

Mobile app: Yes

Cloud storage: Up to 1TB

Reasons to buy

+Unrivalled image organization and cataloguing+Fast color corrections using Presets+Available for desktop, tablet and mobile

Reasons to avoid

-Monthly subscription only-RAW image conversion could be more advanced

Lightroom isn’t like many others. It’s an image-editing app, sure, but its approach is completely different to that of Photoshop and its imitators. At heart, Lightroom is a raw image organization, cataloguing, and developing app aimed at professionals who can dump their memory cards into it at the end of the day, and quickly get a catalogue of the day’s shooting with geotags and facial recognition from the Catalog module, where they can search and rate files to find the best ones. 

Then, they can take their chosen raw files into the Develop module, and adjust things like contrast, brightness and color saturation, as well as applying lens profiles that smooth out lenses’ idiosyncrasies such as vignetting and distortions. From here, they can export a JPEG image they can send to the picture desk of whichever publication commissioned them for the work.

However, it’s perfectly possible to use Lightroom differently. Its workflow is completely non-destructive, so you’re always left with your original file as a kind of digital negative. Your changes are only made permanent when you export a new image, and then only on that new file. You don’t have to work with raw files either, though astrophotographers may like to because of the increased color depth that’s captured. Lightroom also excels at batch processing images, so all 300 of your star trails images can be passed through it, automatically edited in the same way, then exported to another app for stacking.

Adobe Photoshop CC: Best for large projects

Lightroom’s brother, and the app most copied by other image-editing software. Photoshop CC is the industry standard photo editing app, and as such a great tool for the astrophotographer. 

Photoshop’s method of editing is based on selections and layers, meaning you can edit the sky in the image separately from the land by making a selection. Selections can be automatically applied - the new Adobe Sensei cloud AI tech that allows the subject of a photo to be perfectly identified and selected just by choosing a menu option is phenomenal - or can be painstakingly manually created.

Layers are what allow you to build up complex effects. Think of them as a vertical stack of acetate sheets ready to go on an overhead projector and you won’t go far wrong. Layers can be moved around, blended together, painted on, completely hidden, or have holes cut in them, and for something like a star trail image that merges hundreds of slightly different photos, or revealing the soft light of a nebula from many stacked frames of the same thing, are absolutely essential.

Affinity Photo: Best budget option for astro enthusiasts

Affinity Photo

There are some useful preset astro features available on this editing app, which is cheaper than some of its rivals.

Specifications

Payment type: One-off

Compatibility: Windows, Mac

Mobile app: Yes

Cloud storage: None

Reasons to buy

+Cheaper Photoshop rival+Some dedicated astro features+Excellent tutorials

Reasons to avoid

-Can be tricky if you're already used to Photoshop

Serif Software’s rival to Photoshop takes Adobe’s selection and layer method of photo editing and applies it directly to night-sky images through its Astrophotography Stack persona (the personas are Photo’s way of reconfiguring its user interface for specific tasks, it has one for exporting images, another for decoding raw files, and so on). 

At its simplest, this means you can import light and calibration frames into Affinity Photo, then click a button and have them automatically stacked, ready to be moved to the app’s main Photo persona to have color-boosting and sharpening edits applied. Advanced users can delve much deeper into the options, to the extent of manually choosing the Bayer pattern used during raw decode, or using frame analysis to reject those with star trailing or other flaws.

Another astro-specific feature is the dedicated Remove Background filter for astrophotography, which can help if a background color cast has crept into your images, returning the sky between the stars to black.

Luminar AI: Best for speedy editing

Luminar AI

Thanks to some powerful AI tools, this reasonably priced software allows you to make super fast edits.

Specifications

Payment type: One-off

Compatibility: Windows, Mac

Mobile app: No

Cloud storage: No

Reasons to buy

+Super fast edits with powerful AI tools+Templates make it easy to enhance images with no prior knowledge

Reasons to avoid

-Batch processing could be simpler-No dedicated astro tools

Skylum, the developer of Luminar, has taken a slightly different line on image-editing than Adobe and many of the other software houses in the sector. It prefers to provide a series of pre-set ‘looks’ that you can apply to your image, then fade back and even apply selectively. This makes it easy to apply changes to the entire image, or just the sky, and there are AI tools that can alter your pictures in ways you may not have thought of. 

Traditional image-editing tools are there, but aren’t the application’s focus. It also suffers from a bit of fragmentation, with Luminar 4 and Luminar AI being joined by the recently announced but not yet available Luminar Neo. The company has since ‘retired’ Luminar 4, but insisted in an online briefing that Neo is somehow not its replacement. So which photo.to editor you get depends on what you want. Luminar AI is a simpler, faster app built around the company’s AI tools, while Neo will take centre stage as the company’s flagship product, bringing a new editing engine and the ability to create more refined images. It’s a complicated situation entirely of Skylum’s making, so be sure to read up on exactly what you’re buying before you dive in.

PhotoDirector 13: Best for beginners

CyberLink PhotoDirector 13

The software is easy to use and packs in lots of social media friendly features, but it might not suit experienced astrophotographers.

Specifications

Payment type: Subscription and one-off

Compatibility: Windows, Mac

Mobile app: Yes

Cloud storage: No

Reasons to buy

+So easy to use+Brilliant static and animated effects for social media+Great for both editing and enhancing

Reasons to avoid

-Lacks some lens profiles-Feels very iterative

There are a lot of tools in PhotoDirector 13. A lot. To call it feature-packed would be an understatement, and we must surely be approaching some sort of limit in the number of ways an image file can be poked, prodded, warped, and generally messed around with. We’re not there yet though, as we’re sure version 14 will have even more, but it makes you wonder how many more features can be squeezed into one app.

From an astrophotography viewpoint, however, this isn’t necessarily a good thing. PhotoDirector is a beginner-friendly application that can turn its hand to editing just about any images, astro included, but its attempts to appeal to as many people as possible make it harder to find the tools that would be useful for night-sky shots.

It's one-off fee is similar to that of its rivals, but you can also purchase a subscription version – PhotoDirector 365 – which is a little more expensive and offers an extra 50GB of cloud storage for the duration of your subscription.

Adobe Photoshop Elements: Best for amateurs

Adobe Photoshop Elements

A solid, entry-level piece of software for hobbysists.

Specifications

Payment type: One-off

Compatibility: Windows, Mac

Mobile app: No

Cloud storage: 2GB

Reasons to buy

+Technique guides are helpful+Quick switch between Editor and Organizer

Reasons to avoid

-No profiles for lens correction

This is the cut-down, beginner-friendly, version of Photoshop aimed at enthusiastic amateurs rather than professionals. The differences are stark, especially in the way you pay for it. Adobe’s Creative Cloud apps - that’s Photoshop and Lightroom on this list - are subscription software. That means you pay a set amount each month, and if you stop paying the software stops working. The payback for this is that you always have the very latest version of the application, with bugfixes and new features coming down your internet pipe in quick succession.

For Elements, which also has a video-editing brother called Premiere Elements, you pay once. For that, you might get a couple of updates, but next year there will be a new version of the app available that you’ll need to buy again if you want to upgrade. Lightroom and Photoshop are available in the good-value Photographer’s Bundle, so to buy Elements you really need a good reason. That may be the app’s ability to teach you image editing through its Guided mode, or maybe you strongly believe in being able to keep your software without subscribing. However, even though Photoshop’s layer and selection approach is replicated almost perfectly here, along with some neat new Sensei AI features, there's not much on offer to specifically attract astrophotographers.

ACDSee: Best for organization

ACDSee Photo Studio

A good value piece of software with a really useful, built-in organization system.

Specifications

Payment type: Subscription or one-off

Compatibility: Windows, Mac

Mobile app: Yes

Cloud storage: At additional cost

Reasons to buy

+Great for batch conversion+Decent value+Good organizer

Reasons to avoid

-Professional version doesn't have layers-Confusing pricing

ACDSee is a name that’s been around for a long time in the image editing business (though not as long as PaintShop Pro, below) and it now comes in two versions: Professional and Ultimate. 

ACDsee offers raw image processing, so you won’t need a separate app if you’re shooting raw files, and in its Ultimate incarnation has some Photoshop-like layers for you to adobe flash player cc 2015 crack - Crack Key For U up images with. There's also an Advanced Lighting EQ tool that can be applied selectively, helping to bring out the best in the soft, dim glows from the night sky.

Elsewhere, ACDsee is the app that can really do everything, so it’s a great choice for a general-purpose image editor. It has a catalogue management interface that’s broadly similar to Lightroom’s, and is split into a series of modules in the same way Affinity Photo has personas. The main Edit module functions more like Photoshop, and between this and the Develop module that decodes your raws, there are a lot of tools on offer, many of which can be turned on the night sky.

Corel PaintShop Pro: Best for learning new tools and techniques

Corel PaintShop Pro

The list of features and tools available in Corel PaintShop just keeps growing, so amateurs can pick up plenty of new skills as this package expands.

Specifications

Payment type: One-off

Compatibility: Windows

Mobile app: No

Cloud storage: No

Reasons to buy

+Broad range of tools+Easy to learn and grow with

Reasons to avoid

-Only works with Windows-Not as advanced as Adobe

Another long-time member of the image-editing club, Paintshop Pro takes a similar layer-based approach to Photoshop. There's raw image support, and it’s starting to get the kind of AI and content-aware tools that can make such a difference to astrophotos. 

Sadly, while the app has a specialist workspace with custom tools for editing underwater photos and those taken by drone, night-sky shots don’t get the same kind of attention. As a general-purpose image editing app, however, there are plenty of tools and effects that can be used to enhance your astro images, even if they’re not specifically tailored to it. This is particularly true of its noise reduction tools, as night sky photography sometimes involves pushing camera ISO uncomfortably high.

DxO Photolab: Best for noise reduction

DxO Photolab

The Powerful AI tools packed into this app can keep images clean and precise by removing excess noise.

Specifications

Payment type: One-off

Compatibility: Windows, Mac

Mobile app: No

Cloud storage: No

Reasons to buy

+Excellent noise reduction+Lightroom plugin

Reasons to avoid

-Not a general-purpose tool

A digital darkroom rather than a full-fledged image editing app, Photolab has one particular feature that will make astrophotographers happy - its AI-powered DeepPRIME noise reduction. Along with the haze-reducing Clearview tool, it can effectively improve the contrast and color saturation of your deep sky images. There's comprehensive lens correction too, to smooth out the distortion added to images by camera lenses, particularly ultrawide-angle ones.

You’ll need to shoot in raw, though. The additional color depth provided by these unprocessed files is always welcome, but some find the extra PC power and storage space required to edit them makes shooting in JPEG more attractive. 

Advanced users can install Photolab as a plugin for Lightroom, spending most of their time in Adobe’s app but moving to Photolab to take advantage of its fearsome AI tools. 

Capture One Pro: Best for powerful editing tools

Capture One Pro

Super powerful, this package has a wide range of editing tools and works reliably for tethered shooting - but it comes with a steep price.

Specifications

Payment type: Subscription and one-off

Compatibility: Windows, Mac

Mobile app: Yes

Cloud storage: No

Reasons to buy

+Extremely professional quality

Reasons to avoid

-Expensive

Another app that follows the Lightroom template rather than the Photoshop one, Capture One Pro makes tethered and studio photography its speciality, and is noted for the high quality of its raw image decoding. However, it’s compatible with a wide range of other image formats, including the HEIC files produced by recent iPhones.

Aimed at the professional market, it’s not a beginner-friendly app, but once you’ve got to grips with it it’s uniquely powerful, bringing together the best of Lightroom and Photoshop (with its adjustment layer based editing system) and a new Learn button that opens up a set of tutorials. 

The final problem with Capture One is that it’s expensive photo.to editor you could get two or more of the other apps on this page for the same price. If you’ve got a rare or particularly expensive camera, then it might be the only option, but for those using Canons, Nikons and the rest, it’s probably not the best choice.

Join our Space Forums to keep talking space on the latest missions, night sky and more! AOMEI Partition Assistant 9.3 Crack + Keygen Key Free Download 2021 if you have a news tip, correction or comment, let us know at: [email protected]

Ian has been a journalist for over 20 years. He's written for magazines and websites on subjects such as astronomy, PC hardware, popular (and unpopular) science, gardening and keeping fish. In his spare time he has a pet tortoise and grows his own vegetables.

Источник: https://www.space.com/best-photo-editing-apps

How to Edit Photos Without Photoshop

It seems like every day a new photo editing program pops up promising new effects, new frames, and new ways to add mustaches to your photos. What a time to be alive!

But what if you want to do something more complex, like remove the background from a product photo, combine pictures, or take away a few wrinkles? In those cases, you’ll arrive at an advanced image editor like Photoshop.

Photoshop is powerful software with a lot of loyal and happy users. Photo.to editor problem is, it’s tough for beginners to learn, and it’s expensive too.

Fortunately, there are lots of low-cost or free Photoshop alternatives that can help. In this post, I’ll go over some of the best online photo editors for beginners. 

Tools to edit photos without Photoshop

  1. GIMP: Free, open-source photo editor similar to Photoshop.
  2. Pixlr E: Free Photoshop tool that doesn’t need a download.
  3. PicMonkey: Powerful image editor easier than Photoshop photo.to editor at $8/mo, $12/mo for background removal tool).
  4. Canva: Online tool for social media images with text and graphics. ($12/mo for background removal tool.)
  5. Pixlr BG: Free photo.to editor to remove the background of an image.
  6. Tucia: Professional photo editing service to fix photos for you. Pay per image with no subscriptions. 

All of these Photoshop alternatives work for Windows and Mac.

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1. Free photo editors similar to Photoshop  

Who are they for? Someone who knows a little bit about editing photos already, or is game to figure it out.

These free alternatives to Photoshop are a great option that many people don’t know about. They can still layer and combine photos, or add or remove someone from a picture, all without Photoshop. The downside? They look and feel very similar to the real deal. So if you hate using Photoshop, go ahead and scroll down to Option 2. 

GIMP (Free)

GIMP is an open source and completely free photo editor that could be Photoshop’s long lost twin. You don’t get a fancy interface, but you do get free access to a very powerful program that can do just about anything you need. You also get lots of tutorials from the community, many languages, and the warm and fuzzy feeling that you are supporting an open-source and volunteer-run project.

Pixlr (Free)

Pixlr is a pretty robust free photo editor that’s actually a web app, so whether you have Windows or a Mac, you don’t need to download any software. You just use it right in your browser. I like that they don’t require you to create an account or jump through hoops to download your images. And when you save an image, it’s very easy to adjust the image size and file size to optimize it for your website. 

There are two free versions: Pixlr X and Pixlr E. Pixlr X is the easiest, most basic. It’s closer to the photo editing software you might find in Windows or iOS. Pixlr E is more advanced. It has layers and tools similar to Photoshop. (You can also upgrade to Pixlr Pro for $7.99/mo to get more features and get rid of the ads). 

One look at Pixlr E and you’ll see how closely it matches the Photoshop interface. 

A screenshot from the Pixlr E photo editor.

A common complaint about Pixlr is that it has the same steep learning curve as Photoshop, and not a lot of support to go with it (it is free, after all). However with a little digging you’ll see that their blog is actually full of good articles. Google “How do I ____ in Pixlr?” and a helpful tutorial will likely pop up in the results. Another plus is that the editor is available in almost 30 languages.

Runner up: Fotor 

Fotor calls itself “fundamentally Photoshop online” and is available in 8 languages. You can try it for free but you can’t remove the watermark without a Pro plan, which is $8/mo. I also found the background removal tool difficult to use.

2. Online photo editors different from Photoshop

Who are they for? Someone who needs to do advanced photo edits, but doesn’t want to use a complicated program like Photoshop.

When you start looking at Photoshop alternatives, you’ll see that most programs try to copy the Photoshop experience, from layers to lasso tools. If you happen to hate that experience, you’ll want to find a powerful tool with a simple process. That’s where I recommend PicMonkey.

PicMonkey ($)

PicMonkey is an easy image editor with a focus on the kinds of edits that people typically want to make, like fixing up someone’s complexion or adding fun effects for different holidays. Best of all, its buttons are labeled in plain English instead of with mysterious icons, and helpful popups tell you exactly how to use each tool. Currently it’s available in English and Spanish. 

That said, it’s $8/mo, so probably only worth it if you know you’re going to use it a lot. If you’re on the fence, consider a free trial to test it out or even just edit one sample photo to see what the tool is like. Similar to other popular graphic design tools, PicMonkey has a ton of templates, fonts, and other fun things for branding and marketing. 

A screenshot of the PicMonkey photo editor.

Runner-up: Canva

Canva is a great graphic design program for beginners. I don’t have it as a top pick here because I find that it’s less of an alternative to Photoshop and more for creating social media-friendly images with text and other graphics. It has a ton of trendy templates for every business-related piece of marketing you’d probably ever need. But its photo editing tools are fairly basic. It’s available for free, but you have to upgrade to the paid plan ($12.95/mo) to use the background removal tool. 

3. How to remove an image background without Photoshop

Who are they for? Someone who just wants to remove the background from an image.

Removing the background of an image isreally handy for product photos or icons. But it’s surprisingly tricky without the Photoshop lasso tool.

An example of removing the background of an image and using it on your website.

Most background erasers work the same way. You upload your image and mark the part you want in green and the background in red. Then the software takes over and cuts the image out for you—with varying levels of success depending on how clear the boundaries are between your object and your background. Then you get a chance to touch it up yourself.

Pixlr BG (Free)

Pixlr BG wasn’t available the last time I wrote on this topic, but it’s my new favorite free background remover. It’s genuinely free—you don’t need an account and there are no tricks or limitations that you get with other tools. Most importantly, it works really well! Its “AI Cutout” technology worked automatically on the dog photo without me needing to painstakingly trace an outline with my mouse. I just needed to touch it up slightly, and the tool made this process easy and intuitive. 

Runner up: Background Burner

When I first wrote about these programs a few years ago, I recommended Background Burner. It still works well and it’s still free. The only catch is that you have to create an account with Bonanza, an online retailer, in order to download your images, and its interface isn’t as nice. So that’s why I think Pixlr BG is now the best free background eraser. 

Tip: For more step-by-step tips, check out our Beginner’s Guide to Customizing Your Jimdo Website.

Paid tools to remove photo backgrounds

I didn’t have any trouble with the free version of Pixlr, but there are also paid alternatives to Photoshop if you want to clip something out of an image. They all work the same way but have different pricing.

  • Autoclipping: Pay as you go or get a monthly subscription, depending on how many images you plan on downloading. There’s also a free version for non-commercial use.
  • ClippingMagic: This tool works really well. The lowest package is $3.99/mo for 15 credits, which translates to 15 downloaded images. The nice thing is you can re-edit and re-download an image without it counting as another credit.
  • PicMonkey has a background eraser tool included in their Pro plans ($13/mo).

4. How to find a professional photo editing service

Who are they for? Someone who wants to outsource their photo editing. 

Hey, not all of us are into editing photos. Maybe you have a ton of product photos for your online store, or you’re trying to outsource more tasks so you can focus on your top priorities. If that’s the case, there are services that will edit your photos for you—from simple edits to more complex effects. Here are some options:

Pixelz Solo ($)

Pixelz is a nice professional option that specializes in ecommerce photos. They’ll help you with backgrounds, make sure everything is cropped consistently, and even provide invisible mannequins. The subscription starts at $9/mo and then you pay about $1.50 for each image. The turnaround time is 48 hours.  

Tucia ($)

Tucia is one of the largest online photo retouching services. At $8/image for basic fixes and $40/image for advanced effects, this could be worth it if you want to turn a photo into a high-impact website background image or if you have a headshot that needs some retouching. You pay per image, so you’re not locked into any monthly subscription. 


Don’t be discouraged by Photoshop’s tricky interface or high price. There are still lots of ways to edit photos for your website. Give some of these options a try, and see what you think! Also check out our tips for optimizing your photos for both your design and your SEO, and our favorite sources for free stock photography online.

Bring your business online with Jimdo.

Источник: https://www.jimdo.com/blog/how-to-edit-photos-without-photoshop/

Easy: just use Img2Go’s image editor! This is how you can edit photos and images online and completely for free.

First, upload your image from your phone or hard drive, a URL or a cloud storage. It will show up on the editing canvas next.

On the top, choose what you want to do with your image. Add K7 Total Security 16.0.0532 Crack With Activation Key [Latest 2021] Free, shapes, filters, or rotate, resize, and crop your image. Don’t forget to hit “Apply” afterwards.

Then, all you have to do is click on “Save File” and download your edited photo. You can even choose the format to save it in.

You can rotate, crop, add text and filters, resize, draw – but only image files. The photo editor will thus work with all common raster and vector images, but not with other files such as documents.

Once edited, you can also choose the file format you want to save your image in. For example after using the “corners” function, you can save as PNG to retain the transparency. These formats are available:

Image Formats:

BMP, EPS, GIF, HDR/EXR, ICO, JPG, PNG, SVG, TGA, TIFF, WBMP, WebP

So, what can you do with this online image editor?

Transformations:

Resize images, crop parts of the image, mirror or rotate your photos. You can also add rounded corners to your image which stay transparent when saving as an image format that supports transparency (such as PNG or GIF).

Adding:

Add different filters, stickers, frames, and shapes to your image. Add text, draw on your image, and even add other images photo.to editor top of your photo.

Источник: https://www.img2go.com/photo-editor

What Is Photo Editing?: A Definition

by Alexandra Sheehan on

The photoshoot is only the first half of creating a great image. A skilled photo editor can take a good RAW image and use a myriad of techniques to create a stunning final photo. Post-processing can enhance what you did capture and create effects that aren’t always possible in the photography studio.

This is especially true when it comes to ecommerce product photography that can seem creatively limiting. Curious about post-processing and how you can use it to improve your business?

Get a refresher on the definition of photo editing and learn about what a photo editor is and how to incorporate photo editing into your business.

In this article:

What is photo editing?: A definition

Photo editing is the act of altering an image. But that’s oversimplifying a subject that can be complex and employs different methods and tools.

For example, some photo editing techniques are done manually, while others are conducted through automated software. Some photo editing is even done offline, on actual photographs, posters or other printed collateral.

Other terms for photo editing:

  • Image editing
  • Post-processing
  • Image/photo manipulation
  • Photoshopping
  • Image/photo enhancement

Importance of photo editing

Editing helps you get the best image possible, as close to what you imagined when you took the photo (or better perhaps). Niche photographers can hone and emphasize their personal style. And for businesses, editing helps cement branding.

Photo editing is particularly important for ecommerce companies. The quality of the image directly affects people’s opinion of the product and sales numbers. Studies have confirmed that high-quality images outperform stock (or poorer quality) imagery and that increasing the number of high-quality images helps build trust with consumers and increases conversion rates.

What are the different types of photo editing?

There are many ways to edit a photo — some simple and others more complicated.

Most people can figure out simple photo-editing techniques on their own—though this does require time and patience. More complex adjustments may require a dedicated software program or a trained professional editor.

Simple photo-editing techniques include:

  1. Straighten: commander file manager - Crack Key For U the horizon of the photo
  2. Crop: trimming out a portion (usually peripheral) of the image to help draw attention to the subject or otherwise improve the composition
  3. Resize: adjust the dimensions of the image
  4. Sharpen: enhance the definition of the edges in an image (will not make a blurry image in-focus).
  5. Noisereduction: smoothing the picture out, typically accomplished by reducing the pixel size
  6. Whitebalance: the color of the light in the image
  7. Contrast: higher contrast makes an image more punchy, while lower contrast makes it flatter in color
  8. Exposure: the brightness of the photo
  9. Lenscorrection: lessens the effect(s) of the camera lens
  10. Color adjustments: change the color of an item or element in the photo
  11. Background removal: delete the background from the image, isolating the subject (this is often used for white background product photography)

More complex techniques include:

  • Clipping paths: vector path that differentiates the part of the image that’s visible and the part that’s transparent (extracts a subject or element from an image)
  • Portrait corrections: complexion touch-ups and enhancements
  • Drop and reflection shadow: create and adjust shadows
  • Special effects: this can mean an array of things, from animation to adding weather conditions like fog or snow
  • Adjusting text and visuals: add overlays or manipulate what’s already there
  • Photo stitching: when you seamlessly put two images together to make it look as though they were shot that way
  • Photo masking and Layers: the process of hiding and revealing specified portions of an image

Pixel editing and parametric image editing

Two methods of digital photo editing are pixel editing and parametric image editing. Let’s look at their definitions:

What is pixel editing?

Pixel editing, or pixel-level editing, is when you alter an image at the pixel level. Because you’re altering the pixels themselves, this also permanently changes the image file. That’s why pixel editing is considered Glary Utilities Pro 5.145.0.171 Crack License key Free destructive form of photo editing because it’s not as easy to undo the changes and restore the original file.

Pixel editing allows you to make extremely detailed edits and accomplish certain functions that parametric image editing can’t (like CMYK color modes, for example).

What is parametric image editing?

Parametric image editing (PIE) doesn’t change the pixels of the image. Instead, these edits are recorded as a set of steps to follow to accomplish the final look. Thus, it’s a non-destructive mode of photo editing. However, PIE doesn’t always allow for all types of edits.

Many in the industry recommend starting with PIE, and then using pixel editing to refine the final details.

Photo-editing history

Examples of photo editing

There are so many ways to edit photos, and everyone has a unique approach. You might see examples of photo editing on social media, like this video on Instagram showing how to edit using Picsart.

Here are a few tutorials that walk you through the photo-editing process on your own:

Editing product photos

Product images will almost always require or benefit from post-processing. One of the main things you want to be mindful of is consistency, especially if you’re working on multiple products for the same company or are providing several types of photos of the same product.

Visuals help market brands and sell products, but you should also think about where the image will be used. Is it for an advertisement, ecommerce page, social media, or a print catalog? A white background shot will call for much different edits than an image for a Facebook ad. Likely, you’ll be able to get more creative with advertising imagery.

Here are some of the most common types of edits for product photography:

Image source

  • Brightness and exposure: If you didn’t nail the lighting, you can make substantial adjustments post-shoot.
  • Background removal: This is a super-common edit for product photos, especially if you’re listing the item on Amazon, which has a white background requirement. Regardless, white background maintains consistency.
  • Color correction: It’s important that product photos portray the item as accurately as possible so it’s a smart idea to color correct all of your product images. As many as 64% of returns happen because the product didn’t match customer expectations based on product images and descriptions.
  • Colorchange: For products that come in several colors, it’s important to showcase the variety. Instead of photographing the product in every color, photo editors can make the changes post shoot.

Learn how to edit your photos

If you’re ready to learn how to edit your own photos, we’ve put together a handy collection of Photoshop tutorials. Here are a few we recommend you get started with:

What is a professional photo editor?

A person who edits images can either be self-employed, contracted by an outsourced company or agency, or someone who works in-house. There are many possible job titles for a photo editor, including digital photo editor, graphic designer or art director, among others.

Typically, photo editors specialize in specific industries, much like photographers. For example, real estate, editorial, and product photography all come with their own set of trends and intricacies. Editors that focus on ecommerce images know just how to make products pop.

Tackling photo-editing for product photography

Learning new photo-editing techniques can be an enjoyable way to break up your day and add to your industry knowledge, but editing photos can be time-consuming, especially if photography is your specialty. If you need fast, affordable, high-quality photo-editing services, the professionals at Path are here to help.

Alexandra Sheehan

In her past agency life, Alex has led digital marketing initiatives for Fortune 500 companies. Now, she’s passionate about helping retailers and retail industry leaders harness the power of the written word and fuse it with strategic content, email and social media marketing campaigns.

Источник: https://pathedits.com/blogs/tips/what-is-photo-editing

A few weeks ago, I promised on my Instagram stories that I will be photo.to editor my photo editing tips and tricks. Don’t worry guys!! I definitely haven’t forgotten about my promise! 🙂 Okay – Enough fluff, let’s go straight into the good stuff. Here is how I edit my Instagram Photos!

PS: Just a quick intro for those who found this post KLS Backup Professional 10.0.3.7 Crack + Keygen Free Download Google Search, you probably don’t know me so here is a link to my Instagram account @girleatworld, where my photo taking and editing style have earned me over 390k followers.

The Camera I use

This is one of those “if I have a nickel everytime someone asks me…” question. I’ve gotten questions from many of you asking me what camera I use, and I think the answer surprised most people. I take my photos with the one device that’s always in my pocket (and probably yours as well): iPhone’s small, yet powerful camera.

I had an SLR camera which I used to take with me on my travels many years ago. But since I got my first iPhone in 2010, I have slowly transitioned to using just the Adobe Animate CC Free Download camera. I’m a no-fuss casual photographer and I want to edit my photos on the spot without having to deal with transferring files, so phone-editing is perfect.

I also love how a small phone camera allows me to snap away inconspicuously and efficiently. Taking a photo for @GirlEatWorld is not exactly a glamorous activity so I prefer to blend in and take it as quickly as possible.

Me, taking a photo in Old Town Prague and trying not to get hit by traffic.

Disclaimer: All the tips and apps I’m going to recommend are for iPhone. Unfortunately, I can’t advise if other phones have the same features since I am not experienced with them. Also, I’m by no means a professional photographer – I’m just sharing all the self-learned methods I’ve discovered over the years so these tips might seem very elementary to some of you.

Tools & Gears I use

Camera Gears

  • iPhone XS Max 256GB -I have pretty much used all iPhone generation since iPhone 4. I’ve always opted for the biggest storage because I take a lot of photos and I don’t want to worry about running out of space. With the 256GB storage, I have not had to empty out my photos or photo.to editor apps in 3 years (!!).
  • Ring Grip Holder – It’s a ring-shaped plastic that can be attached to the back of your phone case. This grip might look weird, but it has been massively helpful in providing more grip and stability. Having the grip on the back of the phone allows me to easily take photos with one hand.
  • Mobile Tripod – A flexible and lightweight tripod like this is a nice to have, especially if you’re traveling alone or you want to get a group shot with everyone in it. It also helps with stuff like time-lapse videos.

iOS Apps

I’ll elaborate more on how I use these apps throughout the post, but I’m just putting it here for easy access.

  • Camera+ – for advanced control of your native camera
  • VSCO Cam – for post-processing and filters
  • Afterlight 2 – for effects like borders and light leaks
  • Facetune – to clean up some distraction and smoothen out textures

Let’s start with the basics: Phone Photography Tips

I’ll be straight with you guys – there is no shortcut to great photography. The only secret is that you must spend time honing your photography skills and keep practicing it. It wouldn’t matter how much editing you do, nothing beats properly shot photos.

So without further ado, here are a few photography tips that have helped me:

1. Composition is LIFE

No matter what camera you use, you must master framing your photos. This is usually referred to as Photo Composition. It is probably the most time-consuming skill to learn, but it is the most rewarding as it allows you to define your own photography style.

I suggest watching this quick video of composition tips by Steve McCurry, one of my favorite travel photojournalist. There are many different types of composition and style, and over time you will start to develop your own style.

As for me, ever since I picked up my first camera I had been obsessed with perfect symmetry (Wes Anderson is my favorite movie director, as you may have guessed) and bokeh, the blurred / out of focus effect you tend to get with certain lens if you take close up shots of an object. Combining these two styles resulted in photos you see at @GirlEatWorld.

2. Use Grids to help you compose

If you are an iPhone user, there is a native support to compose your photos. I recommend to turn on your grids by going to Settings > Photos & Camera > Turn on Grid. This will give you a nice 3 x 3 grids each time you fire up your camera app, which you can then use as a guide to make sure your subject is properly positioned and not crooked.

For @GirlEatWorld, I usually position the subject inside the two bottom middle boxes. For me, this creates the perfect subject to background ratio. This way I don’t overwhelm the background by taking a too-close picture of the food.

iPhone camera with Grid View Enabled

3. Pay attention to the lighting condition of your surrounding

If all else fails, this is the one photography tips you should remember. I always tell people that you cannot take your photos with your back against a light source – be it the sun, a lamp, anything that’s bright. There are some exceptions, such as if you’re taking a silhouette photo – like this photo below where I didn’t mind that the subject was covered by shadow because I wanted to bring more attention to the scenery in the background.

Currumbin Alley in Gold Coast

So next time you take a picture, make it a habit to see where the sun is and try to position yourself opposite of it. Which brings me to my next point…

4. Time of the day matters… a lot.

Though sometimes it can’t be helped, I don’t like taking photos in the middle of the day when the sun is directly on top of you. This tends to cast harsh shadows and it doesn’t look very flattering on photos. Instead, I prefer to take pictures in the morning or a few hours before sunset, where the sky tend to be more beautiful, colorful and the natural light are softer and gold/warm-toned. As such, in the photography world, this timeframe is often referred to as “Golden Hour“.

Singapore Sunset Rooftop Beer

There is also another terminology called “Magic Hour” which is right before sunrise or right after a sunset and tends to produce photos that are more even and whimsical. This was taken during Magic Hour of Boracay:

Boracay Sunset Magic Hour

And here is another one from a rooftop in Hong Kong

Sunset in Hong Kong Rooftop

Go the extra mile: Research ahead

If you’re traveling and planning to visit certain sites, try to research ahead of time where your subject is facing, then arrange your visit accordingly. For example: if your subject is facing east, then you definitely want to go in the morning to catch the morning golden hour. Pay attention to the weather forecast, and be patient if the sun doesn’t come out.

5. Make sure you get the focus and exposure right where you want it

This might be getting a bit technical… but my favorite iPhone camera feature is the tap-to-focus feature and AE/AF lock. AE stands for Automatic Exposure (how much light is in the image) and AF stands for Automatic Focus (where you want things to be sharper). This is really easy to achieve – all you have to do is tap on the subject you want to focus on, and give it a long press until a yellow box appears over your camera viewer. Like this:

iPhone camera with AE/AF Lock Enabled

You can then correct your composition until you get the perfect shot. Keep in mind that you must maintain the same distance from your subject once the lock has been activated. Changing the distance while the focus is locked will make your subject out of focus and you have to re-do the AE/AF lock.

Go the extra mile: Advanced Controls

In most lighting condition, AE/AF lock feature works free draw software. However, for times when the light just refuses to work with me, I use an app called Camera+ for iPhone for further control of my photos. The app allows me to lock the focus and exposure separately. That way, while taking the photo you can arrange your focus and exposure points so that you don’t lose details to overexposure while still getting the focus correctly. For more info on these controls, this article explains it much better than I can!

5. Experiment with different angles and point of view

The other most important tip I have is: Move around and change your angles! Sometimes you just have to experiment with a different viewpoint to get the best shot.

Here, I try to illustrate several photos I took before settling on the one that I ended up posting on Instagram. The process didn’t actually take long at all (I believe it was about 5 minutes). I simply crossed the road, looked up, and thought that this was the better angle.

Photo Angles

Go the extra mile: Get inspirations from Instagram and other photographers

One thing I like to do before travel is to look through the geotag of a location I’m going to visit. I’m usually looking for photos that catch my eyes and bookmark them so that I can reference back to it when I actually visit the location. Then I either try to mimic the same angle or spin-off of my favorite photos for editing practice.

The image below is probably one of the most popular angles of People’s Park Complex in Singapore, but getting the shot itself and editing helped me hone my photo editing skills.

Singapore People Park Complex

Post-processing: Get the editing apps ready

Editing photos after it’s taken is generally referred to as “post-processing”. Even if the composition of the photo you originally took is off, sometimes a little post-processing can still help save it. As a rule of thumb, I try not to over-process photos because this causes the photo to appear less genuine. The most important thing about travel photos is that your image should appear crisp and clear, though this all depends on your own editing style.

1. The basic image editing tips

I use VSCO Cam and Instagram native app for all my editing purposes. They are both very simple apps and I believe they have the best filters and editing capabilities. The editing tools I love using is brightness/exposure and sharpness. I usually try to bump the sharpness to 50 – 70% and this really helps to make the image appear crisper. I also tend to prefer to adjust brightness and sharpness using Instagram more than VSCO as I feel Instagram gives a subtler edit.

As for the filter, I always go to VSCO. The filters I kept going back to is called A7, A8, C7 and C8. Whenever I apply a filter, I never go full strength as it might alter the photo too much, but a little bit (say, 40-50% strength) goes a long way to make the photo stand out in a subtle way.

Another tool I love and use a lot is from Instagram, called Lux effect. When used moderately, it does wonders to your images in bringing out more colors, sharpness, and textures. I used Lux effect on the photo below to help bring out the wooden texture of the building signage, as well as the folds of the jeans worn by the man.

Jewish Quarter in Krakow

2. Don’t be afraid to correct the alignment of your photos

As I said before, one of the styles I adore is symmetry. As such I’m a huge fan of the tilt/rotate, straighten, X-skew and Y-skew tool that you can find in most photography apps these days.

I use tilt/straighten to correct any crooked-ness within my photos – sometimes it doesn’t have to be perfectly straight, just to get it to a point where it feels more balanced. I use the X-skew and Y-skew for a similar reason – to bring more balance to the photos. Basically, the skew tools allow you to correct the perspective of your shot so that it appears more straight and pleasing to the eye. It could be that my image was slightly heavier to the right/left or top/bottom, and the skew tools could really make a difference.

This image I took in a train station in Berlin was originally slightly crooked and not very symmetrical as I took it at a slight angle, but using a combination of tilt, x-skew and y-skew I managed to make it look symmetrical.

Germany Train Station

Similarly, this shot of square tiles was near humanly impossible to be taken as straight as it looks because the tiles itself aren’t really straight in real life. I used the skew tools so that it looks like it’s taken from straight above.

Peranakan Tiles in Singapore

I also use rotate to get a creative with my photo angles. Take this image below for example – of course, this image was originally taken upright but I find that rotating it 180 degrees makes a much more interesting photo.

Singapore's People Park Complex

3. Minimize distractions

I use crop deliberately to frame my subject better. Cropping also helps to create a more zoomed-in effect, so the attention of your viewer is directed to where you want them to look.

This photo I took in Seoul was originally landscape, but I find that portrait orientation would help bring out the details more when viewed from a mobile phone. So I rotated the photo and made it portrait orientation instead, and cropped it for better focus.

Imperial Palace in Seoul

Similarly, this photo I took in Prague was also taken as landscape and from afar, but I wanted to highlight the building and the street itself, so I cropped it to look like it was taken from much closer.

Prague Old Town

I use FaceTune‘s whiten tool to help tone down the colors at a certain spot if I feel the image is already too distracting. In the photo of this image below, the color of the wooden table, paired with its rustic texture, took away too much attention from the main focus of the photo. So I toned down the color of the wooden table so that I can bring the viewer’s attention to the food and accessories on the table itself.

Brunch in Singapore

4. Don’t shy away from experimenting: Try adding borders and effects!

While I try not to post-process too much for photos on @GirlEatWorld, I REALLY go to town with photos I post to my personal Instagram (@ichabunni) which I treat as a photo editing playground.

If you scroll through my personal Instagram, you’ll see that my editing style changes from time to time. There was a period when I was obsessed with light leaks, a period of time where I used white borders on square photos, and there was another time where I alternate between horizontal and vertical photos with thick white borders.

This might not be for everyone, but I’ve been loving thick white border around my Instagram pictures. The app I use for adding a white border is Afterlight 2. I love this app because it preserves the geolocation from the original image, so when you post it on Instagram you can still geotag the location properly!

Sunshine Coast, Australia

I love how the white border makes my feed look like its hung in an art gallery. (Not saying my photos are art… but… you know…)

Hong Kong

At the end of the day, the single most important advice I can give you is to practice editing as many photos as you can. Eventually, you’ll find the style you like and editing will seem like a breeze as it becomes your second nature.

And that’s all I have to say about photo editing on mobile! Phew, that was quite long, wasn’t it? I hope it was worth the wait and that you find this post useful. Please leave me a comment below if you do, and if you want to know anything else – feel free to ask me!

Until next time.

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Filed under: Photography Tips

by Melissa

Hello! Welcome to Girl Eat World. I'm Melissa, the "Girl" in Girl Eat World. I run a popular Instagram account by the same name, @girleatworld, where I update my followers about my food and travel adventure. I love writing really long detailed blog posts about my travel experiences, which I'm guessing was how you ended up on this site! (Read more about me here)

Источник: https://girleatworld.net/how-i-edit-my-instagram-photos/

The best photo-editing software in 2021

The best photo-editing software can turn a mediocre photo into something impressive, and make a great photo spectacular. It allows you to do everything from making subtle tweaks to colour or saturation to the application of filters, removal of blemishes or even wholesale transformations. 

There's a huge range of options out there these days, so to save you from having to try them all, we've rounded up all of the best photo-editing software into one handy guide. Some of the software below is desktop only, while other programmes work in your browser, on a tablet, or even on your smartphone. Our guide covers every price point and ability level, so you're sure to find the best photo-editing software for your needs.

If you specifically need to edit on the go, see our guide to the best photo apps, and if you want to be able to view your images at their best, don't miss our buying guide to the best laptops for photo editing. Meanwhile, read on for the best photo-editing software available now. Find quick links to our top three options below, or scroll down further for our full guide.

The best photo-editing software: our top 3

The best photo-editing software available now

There's no doubt that the latest edition of Photoshop is among the best photo-editing software available. Photoshop CC is astoundingly good, and it has too many great features to summarise in this small space. You can read all about it in our Photoshop CC 2020 review and explore its capabilities further in our roundup of the best Photoshop tutorials. 

You can soup up the software with a selection of free Photoshop brushes and simplify long-winded processes thanks to all the free Photoshop actions available. The monthly cost is not insignificant, so check the best Adobe deals to make sure you don't miss a bargain on a Creative Cloud subscription.

02. Affinity Photo

The best photo-editing software with a one-off fee

Specifications

Platform: Windows, MacOS, iOS (iPad only)

Developer: Serif

Price: $19.99/£19.99 (iPad) / $49.99/£48.99 (desktop)

Reasons to buy

+One-off fee+Comprehensive features

Reasons to avoid

-Empty List

Affinity Photo is a professional-standard photo-editing programme without the high price tag. Its impressive toolset covers digital painting, raw editing, professional retouching and the creation of multi-layered compositions. Other features include advanced lens corrections and best-in-class noise reduction, which allow complete control over images with quality results.

The software is also available as a dedicated iPad app. The first professional photo-editing tool to cater to the tablet, it was named Apple App of the year in 2017. Serif also has a graphic design package (Affinity Designer) and a desktop publishing app (Affinity Publisher) to cover other creative requirements.

CyberLink PhotoDirector 365 offers many of the standard image editing tools and features and throws in some artificially intelligent tricks, such as automatic body shaping, skin and face tools, and some lighting and animation effects. The interface is user friendly enough for anyone who's used to working in the digital space, and it's fast and reliable.

The tool has its flaws, with typos and little glitches that might dissuade power users. That said, the cheap monthly subscription and high-level editing features such as levels and colour adjustment make this a decent option for creatives that occasionally need dedicated software to edit images and don't want to break the bank. For more information, see our CyberLink PhotoDirector 365 review.

04. Luminar AI

Faster photo-editing from Skylum

Specifications

Platform: Windows, MacOS

Developer: Skylum

Price: $79/£79

Reasons to buy

+Lots of tools+Uses AI

Reasons to avoid

-Limited export options

Skylum Luminar AI aims to speed up photo editing so photographers can spend more time creating, and we have to say it does that very well. It uses artificial intelligence to suggest editing options that can enhance photos of different styles. It can suggest the best templates to improve images and has tools that photo.to editor be used to easily tweak skies, accents, skin, faces and even eyes. With a very reasonable one-off cost, this AI-based software is certainly worth checking out.

05. inPixio Photo Studio 11

A great value intuitive photo editor

Specifications

Platform: Windows, MacOS

Developer: inPixio

Price: Regular: $49, Pro: $79

Reasons to buy

+Very simple and intuitive to use+Great value for money+Strong performance with minimal system requirements+Comprehensive tools for RAW editing

Reasons to avoid

-Quite limited photo management tools-Sky replacement doesn't always look realistic

InPixio Photo Studio is another option that offers a lot of bang for our buck. It's intuitive and easy to use, and performs extremely well for the price and system requirements. Version 11 adds in a host of new features including sky replacement (useful, if not always the most realistic it could be), and background blur in the Pro edition, plus improved UI and new photo montage content in both the Regular and Pro editions. 

The ease of use makes this one of the most accessible full-featured photo editors for beginners, allowing quick modifications to be made in no time at all. The AI background eraser and improved cutout tool are particularly useful for making very rapid cutouts. With the Pro version, you also get inPixio's Photo Maximiser for enlarging and Photo Focus for sharpening, two job-specific tools that can be used separately.

06. Pixlr X / Pixlr E

The best browser-based photo-editing software

Specifications

Platform: Browser

Developer: Autodesk Inc

Price: Free

Reasons to buy

+Easy to use+Dropbox integration

Reasons to avoid

-Empty List

Pixlr X and Pixlr E are fast and easy to use, whether on a web or mobile browser. Pixlr X has a useful functionality that allows you to make non-destructive edits to your images, letting you change and fine-tune every edit at any time. Another plus is that you can use the programme within Dropbox, which makes it a great addition to your toolkit for collaborative work. It offers the usual adjustments, filters and texts that will be familiar to Pixlr users and are sure to delight newcomers. Pixlr E offers the same classic photo-editing tools with the addition of some extras for the pros.

06. Corel PaintShop Pro

The best photo-editing software for those on a budget

Specifications

Platform: Windows

Developer: Corel

Price: $69/£69.99

Reasons to buy

+Includes graphic design features+One-off fee

Reasons to avoid

-Empty List

Corel PaintShop Pro has been the budget alternative to Photoshop for PC users for more than two decades, and it's still going strong. The 2021 edition promises to be the fastest, easiest to use and more creative version yet. 

If you can stretch to pay a little more than the price for the standard version, there's also PaintShop Pro 2021 Ultimate, which has been upgraded to include a Refine brush and a dedicated photography workspace.

07. Adobe Lightroom CC

The best photo-editing software for beginners

Specifications

Platform: Windows, MacOS, iOS, Android

Developer: Adobe

Price: $9.99/£9.98 (per photo.to editor to buy

+Good for beginners+Not as complete as Photoshop

Reasons to avoid

-Empty List

Adobe Lightroom is among the best photo-editing software for beginners. It helps you to organise your work by letting keep all of your photography in one place, edit it and share it from anywhere. Many experienced creatives also choose to use Lightroom because it can easily handle complicated image management jobs that Photoshop isn't designed for – it makes light work of day-to-day enhancements and raw files.

You can store images on your computer, iPad, iPhone or Android device and even transfer photos automatically from your phone into Lightroom as you take them. Syncing is automatic, so when you make an edit or flag an image as a favourite in one place, it updates everywhere else too.

08. Photoshop Elements

Another simple, beginner-friendly photo-editing tool

Specifications

Platform: Windows, MacOS, Linux

Developer: Adobe

Price: $99.99 /£86.56

Reasons to buy

+One-off fee+Decent AI tools

Reasons to avoid

-Empty List

Photoshop Elements is a more basic alternative to Photoshop CC. Its handy Quick and Guided Edit modes make it great for beginners, but that doesn't mean it lacks power. 

The 2021 version includes Auto Creations, a collage tool that scans and groups photos automatically or via the tagging and sorting tool Adobe Sensei. It also comes with a range of performance enhancements and upgrades – see our Photoshop Elements 2019 review for more about the software. One plus over Photoshop CC is that Elements doesn't require a subscription.

DxO PhotoLabis a much more specific tool. It's really just a raw converter, but it's perhaps the best raw converter going. It's a specialist, slightly complex tool to use, but it achieves impeccable results. You can browse images on your computer folder by folder, then select an image and choose from the default conversion/correction setting or a range of presets. 

The software offers lens corrections that automatically compensate for the different degrees of distortion, chromatic aberration, edge softness and vignetting that are common to most digital camera lenses. The results are outstanding, although this could never be the only image-editing tool you use.

10. Pixelmator

Great photo-editing software for Mac users

Specifications

Platform: MacOS

Developer: Pixelmator

Price: $29.99/£28.99

Reasons to buy

+Support for M1 Macs+New design

Reasons to avoid

-Empty List

Pixelmator uses Mac OS X libraries for fast, powerful image editing. It allows seamless integration with iPhoto and Aperture, as well as iCloud. There are also built-in export tools for Facebook and Flickr.

Colour correction tools include Hue/Saturation, Shadows/Highlights and Contrast and Pixelmator supports filters – it comes with 150 to experiment with. You can also open and save images in many popular formats, including PSD, TIFF, PDF and PNG. Layers are preserved in Photoshop documents, which lets you collaborate with colleagues who use Adobe's software. A recent update also adds compatibility with Apple's M1-powered machines.

11. Fotor

A useful free photo editor

Specifications

Platform: Web browser, Windows, MacOS, iOS, Android

Developer: Everimagining

Price: Free

Reasons to buy

+Simple interface+Free to use

Reasons to avoid

-Empty List

Fotor comes in mobile, web and desktop version, so there's a suitable option available whether you're at your desk or out and about. The software features a full suite of tools that should cover the majority of immediate editing requirements. 

A one-tap enhance button aims to offer an instant fix, which will be loved by some and hated by others. More control is offered via tools for resizing, cropping, rotating and straightening images. There's also a background remover and some handy retouching tools such as red-eye and wrinkle removal. There's even an HDR image creator and tilt-shift editor in case you're looking to turn your photos into something more dramatic.

12. GIMP

Free, open-source photo-editing software

Specifications

Platform: Windows, MacOS, Linux

Developer: GIMP

Price: Free

Reasons to buy

+Free+Not that user friendly

Reasons to avoid

-Empty List

GIMP is another free photo-editing tool. This open-source photo editor debuted on Unix-based platforms and now offers versions for Linux, Windows and Mac. GIMP, which stands for GNU Image Manipulation Program, offers a broad range of tools including painting tools, colour correction, cloning, selection, and enhancement.

The development team has worked hard to ensure compatibility, so you'll be able to work with all the popular file formats without problems. The software also boasts a very capable file manager built in, similar to Adobe's Bridge.

13. Sumo Paint

Another good in-browser photo-editor

Specifications

Platform: Web browser

Developer: Sumoware

Price: Free for basic online version

Reasons to buy

+In browser editing

Reasons to avoid

-Empty List

Sumo Paint is another very capable browser-based image editor. It boasts all of the standard features you'd expect in a desktop tool – in fact, the Pro version for $9 a month includes the option to download a desktop version if you prefer. 

Tools include brushes, pencils, shapes, text, cloning and gradients, which can all be accessed quickly from a Photoshop-like floating toolbar. Sumo Paint can open saved documents from your hard drive, making it a viable option for editing and re-editing, and its latest upgrade gives it a slick look. There are significant limitations, though. The editor appears to be RGB only, limiting its use to work designed for screens. There are No CMYK, Lab or other colour models offered.

Related articles:

Beren Neale is the deals editor at Creative Bloq. After editing several creative and design magazines - including the graphic design mag Computer Arts - he found his home on the biggest global art and design website, helping digital creatives get the best deals on the kit that they need. 

Источник: https://www.creativebloq.com/features/photo-editing-software

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